The Monarto Metallic Silhouette Rifle Club has written its own procedures for conducting competitions which reference the SSAA rules but also take into account local conditions specific to the Monarto range facilities. The guide does not replace official rules and discipline procedures. The club guidelines can be found at the following link,

FLY

Fancy yourself as a bit of a top shot? Then come and test yourself at Monarto Metallic Silhouette Rifle Club in front of witnesses. Try to hit the great aussie blowie at 500metres. The target has score rings 1 to 10 plus extra points for 5 shot groups under 10 inches: 5 shots & 3 sighters per target & 5 targets per match. You will need a minimum of 40 rounds plus whatever it takes to get sighted in on the target before the match.

A measured 500m may be further than you think and your favorite long range load may well drop more than you expect. Normally shot from benchrest or prone position, three classes are currently being shot. HEAVY for rifles under 50lbs., LIGHT for rifles under 17 lbs., & SILHOUETTE for rifles under10lb 2oz that meet all other silhouette rules.


Bring your favorite long range rifle & we will fit you into an appropriate class. A relatively high powered scope with reliable and extended elevation adjustment would be useful but come and test what you have at present. Smallest 5 shot group so far is 2.290inches Heavy Gun / 2.708inches for Light Rifle & 3.162inches for Silhouette Rifle. Matches will be listed in the MMSRC annual program.


500Mt Fly Shooting RULES

1: Any Cal less than .50Cal

2: Any stock configuration

3: Any scope power including spotting scopes. Competitors may spot for each other

4: Max Open Gun weight 22.73Kg (50lb) Light Gun 7.73Kg (17lb) Hunter Class 4.6kg (10lb 2oz)

5: No rails i.e. Guns shot from separate sand bag rest system where the rear sand bag shall contact both the bench and the rifle. The front sandbag rest can be attached to a pedestal which can have adjustments for windage and elevation.

The rear bag may have a stabiliser plate surrounding it if desired. Light gun class allowed bipods.

6: 7 minute details 1 Target per shooter per detail.

7: Only 5 shots on target 3 sighters at other medium paper or steel for each rely. Payment of nominations shall be deemed total acceptance of these rules.

8: No Muzzle brakes

9:Compliance with range safety rules at all times.

10: Any competitor found not enjoying themselves will be disqualified

200Mt .22 RIMFIRE Fly Shooting RULES

1: Any .22Lr RIMFIRE

2: Any stock configuration

3: Any scope power including spotting scopes. Competitors may spot for each other

4: Max Open Gun weight 22.73Kg (50lb) Light Gun 7.73Kg (17lb) Hunter Class 4.6kg (10lb 2oz)

5: No rails i.e. Guns shot from separate sand bag rest system where the rear sand bag shall contact both the bench and the rifle. The front sandbag rest can be attached to a pedestal which can have adjustments for windage and elevation.

The rear bag may have a stabiliser plate surrounding it if desired. Light gun class allowed bipods.

6: 7 minute details 1 Target per shooter per detail.

7: Only 5 shots on target 3 sighters at other medium paper or steel for each rely. Payment of nominations shall be deemed total acceptance of these rules.

8: No Muzzle brakes

9:Compliance with range safety rules at all times.

10: Any competitor found not enjoying themselves will be disqualified

f LD EL I

MONARTO METALLIC SILHOUETTE RIFLE CLUB

SHOOTING DICIPLINES and RULES

The MMSRC hosts a number of shooting disciplines which are organised according the schedule shown in the Members Area.

Descriptions of the three main styles of competition can be found by following these links;

The SSAA national rules can be accessed via these links;

 

 

 

 

METALLIC SILHOUETTE RIFLE

Metallic Silhouette Rifle Shooting is a very popular International shooting event. It started in Mexico early in this century and has since spread to the U.S.A, New Zealand, Canada, South Africa, France and all states of Australia.

It began as a live animal shoot many years ago, then paper targets were used until finally metal targets were introduced. When it started to gain popularity in America, the targets were standardised and a formal set of rules drawn up. Australia used these rules for several years and now have rules that are better suited to our conditions.

The International Metallic Silhouette Shooting Union was formed in France in early November 1992 comprising of 13 countries to set a International set of rules and conduct the first Would Championships. This was held in France in July 1994. The Australian team in 1994 took out the World Championships.

The shooting is done from what is called the "Standing unsupported position", standing straight up with the rifle fired from the shoulder, with no rest or support for the shooter or for the rifle. If you can shoot accurately standing up you can shoot accurately from any position.

All classes of rifles are used; Air Rifle, Rimfire and Centrefire Rifles. Both iron and telescopic sights are permitted, but no slings or palm rests. The aim is a basic hunting style rifle weighing under 4.6kg (10lb 2oz) with either a magazine or single shot. Some competitors go all out with custom built equipment, but most use factory rifles that have been accurised, this means the trigger has been lightened, the action has been bedded and some minor stock work done to make the rifle fit.

Targets are shot in banks of five in a time limit of 2.5 minutes for five shots. A total of ten rounds at each distance. The targets are silhouettes of Chickens, Pigs, Turkeys and finally Rams at the longest distance. Most matches consist of forty rounds. In Air Rifle 10 chickens at 20 yards, 10 pigs at 30 yards, 10 turkeys at 36 yards and 10 rams at 45 yards. Rimfire has slightly larger animals at 40, 60, 77and 100 meters. Only .22 long rifle ammunition can be used in Rimfire events.

Centrefire targets are a lot larger but further away, at 200, 300, 385 and 500 meters. The rules state the minimum calibre is 6mm-243 but if your rifle is a smaller calibre you can use that until you make the grand decision that you want to compete and get something more appropriate. There are many calibre's' to choose from. The 308 Winchester is a popular choice, but some shooters go for something more exotic. That will be your decision to make. A good compromise is a rifle you can use in the field as well as on the range. Some calibres are better than others but you will need enough steam left to topple a heavy Ram at 500 meters.

Ammunition is mostly hand loaded; it is cheaper and more accurate that way. Full metal jacket projectiles are not used as they can damage the targets. If your load does any damage to the target you will be asked to stop using that particular load or rifle. Each shooter is convinced his or her equipment is best, regardless of what the score sheet says.

The matches are run according to strict safety rules, under under the watchful eye of a range officer. The rules will be explained and an experienced shooter will be assigned to show you the ropes.

The sequence of the shooting is; you will be called to the firing line with the muzzle pointing straight up, when you reach the line, place the rifle in the rest provided. You then stand back and wait for the call 'READY'. You can then pick up your rifle load one round, adjust scopes and get into a comfortable shooting position. 15 seconds later the command 'FIRE' is called and you have two and a half minutes to fire five rounds at your targets. When 'CEASE FIRE' is called you will place the rifle in the stand and the spotter will check the rifle is unloaded and signal the Range Officer. In each detail you will be allowed a spotter/scorer that will tell you where your bullet hit. To score a hit the target must be knocked from its stand. If you hit the target and it doesn't fall from the stand it is counted as a miss. Near enough is not good enough. With centrefire you will hear the clang as the bullet hits and most targets will fall, some spin and at times they just stand there tormenting you.

Your first shoot will be free but if you want to have another go you will have to pay a fee.

SEE THIS LINK FOR THE SSAA RULES ON METALLIC SILHOUETTER RIFLE SHOOTING

FIELD RIFLE

Field Rifle is another discipline under the banner of the SSAA. It is a sport that you can shoot with either Rim Fire or Centrefire rifles at paper targets at various distances.


There are 3 positions you will adopt in Field Rifle; The first is off hand which is used for two sections, the first section is OFF HAND (STANDING) RAPID FIRE in which you fire 3 shots in 15 seconds, this is repeated 4 times and the best 10 shots are used for scoring. The second section is OFF HAND (STANDING) SLOW FIRE; in this section you fire at two targets placing 5 shots on each target (hopefully). For this you have a time limit of 15 min. The third section is STANDING POST REST; in this section you will use a post to hold to give support for the rifle, again you fire at two targets placing 5 shots on each target. For this you have a time limit of 15 min. The last section is SITTING or KNEELING POST; in this section as the name suggest you sit by the post and hold it for support. Again you fire at two targets placing 5 shots on each target (hopefully). For this you have a time limit of 15 min.


As mentioned earlier, both rimfire and centrefire rifles may be used. The main difference between the two is target size and distances (rimfire has smaller targets but at shorter distances). Any caliber centrefire may be used with the smaller .22 cal rifles being preferred as they have less recoil.


A maximum weight limit is set for both rimfire and centrefire rifles but this will be over-looked for first timers. The weight limit is not a real disadvantage as it really only affects those that have specially made rifles

SEE THIS LINK FOR THE SSAA RULES ON FIELD RIFLE SHOOTING